Global Impact of ACEA in the Heavy-Duty Diesel Market

Sep 22, 2021
Posted by Matthew Bentley, Product Manager, Commercial Engine Oil, Steve Semenczuk, Senior Director, Commercial Vehicles, Fabio Araujo, Business Manager, Latin America, Engine Lubricants, Alex Brewster, Product Manager, Commercial Engine Lubricants, Lee Hua Chua, Product Manager, Engine Lubricants, Becky Zhao, Business Manager China, Heavy Duty Engine Oils

Although the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) represents Europe’s 15 major original equipment manufacturers, one in every five trucks, vans and buses around the world is produced in the European Union, making these specifications extremely important in all regions as the engine oil manufacturers change their hardware to meet changing regulations in emissions, fuel economy and a variety of other things that are affecting their hardware. In this video, we explore further.

For more information, please contact your Lubrizol representative.

Video Transcript

ACEA state that in 2019 almost one in every five trucks, vans and buses around the world were produced in the European Union. Many European OEM's often also have established regional production facilities, meaning that global engine technology platforms are becoming more and more common around the world.

Although ACEA represents Europe, the new specifications are extremely important, in all regions, as the engine oil manufacturers change their hardware to meet changing regulations in emissions, fuel economy and a variety of other things that are affecting their hardware.

So it's key for oil marketers and end users to comply with the latest ACEA sequence to ensure that their product line is up-to-date with the latest trends in the industry.

From a European perspective, the latest update to the sequences incorporates Euro VI hardware focuses on steel piston deposits, and the focus on ACEA E8 and E 11 really builds on the fact that new vehicles entering the market are almost always equipped with a diesel particulate filter. By having characteristics such as lower levels of sulfated ash, phosphorus and sulfur in the lubricant, it means that advanced aftertreatment devices are a realistic approach to reducing emissions and both of these categories mean that OEM's can produce and sell trucks with a much lower risk of premature damage to hardware and equipment.

Although regions in Southeast Asia tend to be more API-focused, API does not have requirement for biodiesel or biocompatibility testing, while ACEA still calls for biodiesel testing like the CEC L-109. So ACEA is actually very relevant for Southeast Asian market.

China is going to adopt more stringent emission regulations. The implementation of ACEA E8 will provide aftertreatment protection, together with the option for OEM's to explore extended oil drain interval (ODI) performance for their China VI vehicles.

Fifty percent of all formulations used in Latin America for heavy-duty diesel has some ACEA E specification. This new update in ACEA categories brings the higher oxidation protection that is very important in our region, since those vehicles tend to operate at higher temperatures.

With the new specifications is the inclusion of the T-13 test, and that's extremely important in North America, they're important globally because oxidation leads to acid sludge and varnish formation, oil thickening, and ultimately potential decomposition of the oil.

Overall, fleet owner operators can rest assured that no matter where they are in the world, a lubricant approved to an ACEA sequence will provide them with the correct levels of performance in the market.